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  • Core Exercises (Care of the Young Athlete)

    Core exercises strengthen the muscles of the spine, abdomen, and pelvis. These muscles support all physical activity.

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  • Constipation and Your Child

    Bowel patterns vary from child to child just as they do in adults. What's normal for your child may be different from what's normal for another child. Most children have bowel movements 1 or 2 times a day. Other children may go 2 to 3 days or longer before passing a normal stool.

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  • Constipation

    Constipation (kahn-sti-PAY-shun) is common. Children with constipation have stools (poops) that are hard, dry, and difficult or painful to get out. Constipation can be treated.

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  • Connecting With your Community
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  • Connected Kids: Clinical Guide

    CONNECTED KIDS: This extensive clinical guide to the American Academy of Pediatrics' Connected Kids Program contains an overview of all of the program's component parts, a counseling schedule, ideas for practice implementation, and other supplemental

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  • Concussions (Care of the Young Athlete)

    A concussion is any injury to the brain that disrupts normal brain function on a temporary or permanent basis. Concussions are typically caused by a blow or jolt to the head.

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  • Common Childhood Infections

    Most infections are caused by germs called viruses and bacteria. While you may be able to keep germs from spreading, you can't always keep your child from getting sick. It is important for parents to know how to keep their children healthy and what to do when they get sick. Read on to learn more from

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  • Colds

    Most children get 8 to 10 colds before they are 2 years old. Most colds come and go without any big problems.

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  • Cocaine: What You Need to Know

    Young people are surrounded by pro-drug messages in the media and on the Internet. They may try cocaine for the excitement or the experience without realizing the very real risks and consequences that come with cocaine use.

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  • Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    Develop strategies for accommodating children with cleft lip or cleft palate. Suggestions include

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  • Circumcision: Information for Parents

    Parents have different opinions about newborn circumcision based on medical, religious, cultural, and ethnic traditions, and personal reasons. Some parents choose circumcision. Some parents do not choose circumcision. Parents who are undecided should talk with their child's doctor before their child

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  • Choosing the Right Size Bicycle for Your Child

    A bicycle of the wrong size may cause your child to lose control and be injured. Any bike must be the correct size for the child for whom it is bought. To keep your child safe, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the following:

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  • Choosing Quality Child Care: What's Best for Your Family?

    Finding high-quality child care is very important but not always easy. Your choice will play a key role in your child's health and development. Read on for more information from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) about child care options to help you in your search for what's best for your family.

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  • Choosing Over-the-Counter Medicines for Your Child

    “Over-the-counter” (OTC) means you can buy the medicine without a doctor's prescription. Talk with your child's doctor or pharmacist* before giving your child any medicine, especially the first time.

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  • Choking Prevention and First Aid for Infants and Children

    When children begin crawling, or eating table foods, parents must be aware of the dangers and risks of choking. Children younger than 5 years can easily choke on food and small objects.

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  • Childproofing Your Home

    Children are naturally curious and love to explore. Young children especially like to explore by putting things in their mouths. Before or as soon as children begin crawling or walking, parents and caregivers need to take extra steps to make sure harmful items are out of reach, out of sight, and locked

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