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  • Learning Disabilities: What Parents Need to Know

    Your child will learn many things in life—how to listen, speak, read, write, and do math. Some skills may be harder to learn than others. If your child is trying his best to learn certain skills but is not able to keep up with his peers, it’s important to find out why. Your child may have a learning

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  • Lead Is a Poison: What You Need to Know

    Lead in the body can affect child development and behavior. Lead is a metal that is found in a lot of places. Though you can't usually see it, there are things you can do to prevent your child from being exposed to lead. No safe level of lead has been identified for children. Children are at highest

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  • Lawn Mower Safety

    The power lawn mower is one of the most dangerous tools around the home. Each year, approximately 68,000 persons with injuries caused by power mowers were treated in emergency departments. More than 9,000 of the people hurt were younger than 18 years. Older children and adolescents were most often hurt

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  • Lawn Mower Safety

    Each year many children are injured severely by lawn mowers. Power mowers can be especially dangerous. However, most lawn mower-related injuries can be prevented by following these safety guidelines.

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  • Lactose Intolerance and Your Child

    After drinking milk or eating ice cream, does your child have stomach cramps or get diarrhea? If so, your child may have lactose intolerance.

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  • Lacrosse (Care of the Young Athlete)

    Lacrosse is one of the fastest-growing sports in the United States. It's both a contact (boys) and noncontact (girls) sport. Injuries differ between the contact game of boys' lacrosse (body contact and stick checking allowed) and the noncontact

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  • Know the Facts About HIV and AIDS

    HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is a virus that can lead to AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). While there is no cure for HIV, early diagnosis and treatment are very effective at keeping people healthy. In addition, there are things you can do to prevent getting HIV. Read on to learn more

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  • Kidney/Urinary Problems

    Nephrotic syndrome can occur at any age but is most common between the ages of 18 months and 8 years. Boys are affected more often than girls. A child may come to the child care or school with the diagnosis or may develop it while enrolled.

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  • Keep Your Family Safe: Fire Safety and Burn Prevention at Home

    Fires and burns cause almost 4,000 deaths and about 20,000 hospitalizations every year. Winter is an especially dangerous time, as space heaters, fireplaces, and candles get more use in the home. It is no surprise that fires in the home are more common between December and February. However, you might

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  • Jaundice and Your Newborn

    Congratulations on the birth of your new baby!

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  • Is Your Toddler Communicating With You?

    Your baby is able to communicate with you long before he or she speaks a single word! A baby's cry, smile, and responses to you help you to understand his or her needs. In this publication the American Academy of Pediatrics shares information about how children communicate and what to do when there are

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  • Is Your Child Ready for Sports? (Care of the Young Athlete)

    Sports readiness means that a child has the physical, mental, and social skills to meet the demands of the sport. While general guidelines can help you select a sport based on age, it's important to remember that children develop at different

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  • Internet and Your Family, The

    The Internet can connect you and your family to all types of resources. At your computer, you and your family can read the latest news, look up information, listen to music, play games, buy things, or e-mail friends. The possibilities for learning and exploring on the Internet are endless. However, not

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  • Inhaled and Intranasal Corticosteroids and Your Child

    If your child has asthma or allergic rhinitis (hay fever), your pediatrician may prescribe a corticosteroid, also commonly referred to as a steroid. These medicines are the best available to decrease the swelling and irritation (inflammation) that occurs with persistent asthma or allergy. They are not

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  • Inhalants: What You Need to Know

    Young people today can face strong peer pressure to try drugs, including a group of substances called inhalants. Inhalant abuse is particularly a problem with younger teens, but even children as young as 5 or 6 years may try inhalants.

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  • Influenza Vaccine (Inactivated or Recombinant) (VIS)

    With any medicine, including vaccines, there is a chance of reactions. These are usually mild and go away on their own, but serious reactions are also possible.

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