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  • How to Prevent Tooth Decay in Your Baby

    Baby teeth are important. If baby teeth are lost too early, the teeth that are left may move and not leave any room for adult teeth to come in. Also, if tooth decay is not prevented, it can be costly to treat, cause pain, and lead to life-threatening infections.

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  • How Do Infants Learn?
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  • Home Water Hazards for Young Children

    Each year many young children drown in swimming pools, other bodies of water, and standing water around the home. Children must be watched by an adult at all times when in or near water. Children may drown in an inch or 2 of water.

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  • Home Safety Checklist

    Is your house a safe place for your child to live and play? The following safety checklist can help you prevent serious injuries or even death. Though it addresses common safety concerns, it's important to remember that every house is different and no checklist is complete. Because there may be other

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  • Hip Dysplasia (Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip)

    In resistant cases or in older children, hip dysplasia may need to be treated with a combination of braces, casts, traction, or surgery. Your child will be admitted to the hospital if surgery is necessary. After surgery, your child will be placed

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  • Hepatitis C

    About 4 million Americans are infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV), and many do not even know it. Anyone can get infected with HCV, including children.

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  • Hepatitis B Vaccine: What Parents Need to Know

    Hepatitis B is a viral infection of the liver. It is caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Lifelong HBV infection can lead to liver cancer or scarring of the liver (cirrhosis). More than 1 million people in the United States are living with

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  • Haemophilus influenzae Type b

    (Please see the related Vaccine Information Statement, Haemophilus Influenzae Type b (Hib) Vaccine: What You Need to Know)

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  • Growing Independence: Tips for Parents of Young Children
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  • Fun in the Sun: Keep Your Family Safe

    Warm, sunny days are wonderful. It's great to exercise outside, and the sun feels good on your skin. But what feels good can harm you and your family. Read on for information from the American Academy of Pediatrics about how to keep your family safe from the sun’s harmful rays.

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  • Flu, The

    The flu (influenza) is an illness caused by a virus. It affects the whole body. This is not the same as what we often call the “stomach flu.”

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  • Fever and Your Child

    A fever is usually a sign that the body is fighting an illness or infection. Fevers are generally harmless. In fact, they can be considered a good sign that your child's immune system is working and the body is trying to heal itself. While it is important to look for the cause of a fever, the main purpose

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  • Fever

    Fever is a sign that your child is fighting an infection. It is usually harmless. Your child's fever should go away in about 3 days. If it doesn’t, call your child's doctor.

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  • Feeding Kids Right Isn't Always Easy: Tips for Preventing Food Hassles

    Young children need nutrients from a variety of foods to stay healthy. But what if your child only eats macaroni and cheese or will not eat any vegetables?

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  • Febrile Seizures

    In some children, fevers can trigger seizures. Febrile seizures occur in 2% to 5% of all children between the ages of 6 months and 5 years. Seizures, sometimes called “fits” or “spells,” are frightening, but they usually are harmless. Read on for information from the American Academy of Pediatrics

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  • Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)

    Eczema is a chronic skin problem that causes dry, red, itchy skin. It is also called atopic dermatitis or AD. Anyone can get eczema, but it is most common in babies to young adults.

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